Perfect Pitch Museum

Do you have perfect pitch? Can you listen to the howl of the wind, and say that it was blowing in D? Or that a two-tone clock strikes in B minor? This site explores the complexities of perfect pitch, which can be tricky, as there is relative pitch, perfect pitch, and absolute pitch. While some feel that it is an inherited gift, frequently encountered in the blind, others argue that it can be learned. There is a reference to the abilities of the young Mozart, which is to be expected, and a story about Ravel, who lost the ability to express his music, although it was still ‘in his head’. Some features, such as the historical fluctuation of concert A would be of more interest to musicians, but the examples in the section ‘Amazing Feats of the Ear’ would engage everyone else. The ‘Definitions for the Musically Disinclined’ is very helpful in this regard.

I personally believe that you can learn perfect pitch.

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