Tag Archives: education

II-V-I Patterns

I have updated the II-V-I patterns yet again. I consolidated some of the other patterns I had (like the Ray Brown ones). There are now 286 pages (or 286 4 bar patterns) to enjoy. Also gone is the Jazz Font in favor of a more clean, professional look using Bill Duncan’s Fonts for Finale.

These patterns were designed to be used with Aebersold Vol. 3, Track 2. Also included is a 24 page reference of the patterns.

If you want some more patterns, I highly recommend Jerry Bergonzi’s Inside Improvisation Vol. 5. There are some really great patterns in there. Enjoy!

  •   II-V-I Patterns Reference (600.9 KiB, 11,302 hits)
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  •   II-V-I Patterns in C (4.8 MiB, 11,062 hits)
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  •   II-V-I Patterns in C Pages 1 to 100 (1.7 MiB, 10,673 hits)
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The Flute Collection

&G. Schirmer has a new series of books out called The Flute Collection. There are three books in the series, a Easy-Intermediate, Intermediate, and Intermediate-Advanced. These are excellent books. They come with a Flute and a Piano part, the CD (or CDs) come with full performance and accompaniment tracks. Caen Thomason-Redus on Flute and Elena Abend on Piano. 

Plus, if you use the CDs on a computer (Mac or PC), you can run the included Amazing Slowdowner program on the tracks. 

Period Recordings Of Marcel Moyse

Title pretty much says it all. They are old recordings (1930s), but man, the tone is amazing. I can only wonder what he’d sound like using modern equipment. I believe they used to make these straight to disc. Disc, meaning waxed disc. You can learn a little about the technology here and here (take Wikipedia with a grain of salt though).

The recordings are housed here:
http://www60.tok2.com/home/sonore/

Transcriptions of Harold McNair Jazz Flute Solos

John Devitt wrote “Hello all, for those of you interested in studying jazz flute improvisation I’ve uploaded two MIDI files of transcribed solos of the late great jazz flautist Harold McNair to my website. If you don’t have a sequencer or notation program which can print out the solo part you can download the accompanying PDF files and print them out. The files are strictly for private study and may not be used for commercial purposes. On my homepage just scroll down to the MIDI files area. Hope you enjoy,and, of course, feedback is welcome.

Regards,

John Devitt http://home.hetnet.nl/~johmar/index.html

Long Tone Exercises for Young Students . . .

harry63 writes “I teach flute lessons in my community and I am having the hardest time getting my younger students (grades 7-9) to practice their long tones. Their finger technique is excellent, but their tone leaves a lot to be desired. When I ask them I get the “but it’s so BORING” response. I have tried explaining the importance, but they don’t think it is necessary. Are there any suggestions on ways to implement long practicing without giving them boring exercises?”

Software For Flute Practicing

In the latest issue of The Flutist which I receive as being a member of the National Flute Association, there was an article about software for use in practicing and teaching. Here is a brief summary of it and some additions of my own.

The article, written by Joseph Manupello, is interesting, but has a number of errors. Lets start where he starts, with software Metronomes.

He mentions a program called Metronome 2.5 by Nick Baciu. I haven’t been able to find that program, but I did find a great Metronome/Tuner called Enable Tune 2.6 for windows that, for $19.95, does a good job at tuning and keeping time. For Mac people, there are a couple of Metronome programs. And there are programs out there for the Palm as well. I however think if you are going to practice, get a real metronome. Like the Boss Doctor Beat 66 which is great because it’s LOUD, accents downbeats, and does odd meters.

Mr. Manupello’s next section is on tuners, mainly the AP Instrument Tuner 1.02. It’s an interesting product, and there are similar products available for Windows and Macintosh. Cool, but…..why? Pitch is important, but…..this is insane. He even mentions that one of the things he likes about AP Tuner is that you can run two instances of the program (assuming you have 2 sound cards). Why? Personally, I’m amazed at the $30 digital tuners you can get. The keep getting smaller, and faster. My recommendation, get a Seiko or similar tuner. Makes sense, especially if you plan to play somewhere, like a GIG, where you won’t have your computer around.

Finally, Joseph Manupello gets down to business with taking about Spectrogram. Now, this program is very interesting. You can see visualizations of what you sound like. Compare it with other peoples’. Neat, but….thats about it. I don’t think I’d really use it.

Finally, Joseph Manupello ends with talking about Cool Edit. Cool edit allows you to record, edit, etc, etc yourself and your music. There are other programs as well that can do this, such as Soundforge (which I highly recommend) for the PC, and for the Macintosh, I wholeheartly recommend Sound Studio and Amadeus. Both are inexpensive and excellent programs.

The computer is a great tool, but I’ve found that it is best for recording, and composing/edit/printing music. I’ve found that owning a metronome and a tuner is invaluable. You can take them with you, whereever your playing takes you.